When and what should you vacuum seal during a move

Sometimes people opt to pack their house with vacuum sealed bags, helping to save space and protect items during the move. While this is a great method for some items, it’s not going to work for everything. Vacuum packing simply means to vacuum the air out of a plastic bag designed for such task, and keeping the items in the bag sealed tight and taking up minimal space.

When you remove the air from the bag and seal it, you’ll save space for things that are normally space-killers, such as bedding and clothes. Take a look at the items that people often vacuum seal for their move and which ones won’t benefit from this method.

Bedding and pillows

One of the easiest ways to save space in your boxes is to vacuum seal that bulk bedding you own. Bed sheets and comforters are very hard to pack efficiently because they take up so much space and are very large. When you use a vacuum-sealed bag, that big, fluffy comforter can now fit in a more efficient box rather than an oversized one.

Your pillows and other bedding are perfect for this type of bag as well. Bed pillows, throw pillows, bed skirts, and other bedding items can become bulky when folded up or attempted to be stuffed into moving boxes.

Use a vacuum-sealed method for these other bulky items so that you don’t have to feel guilty about how much room these favorite fluffy items are taking up in the moving truck. Your pillows and blankets will spring back to life once you open the vacuum-sealed bag at destination.

Clothes

Just like your bedding, your clothes may start to become bulky when you pack them for the move. These are the most common items for vacuum-sealing, for everything from moving to just going on vacation. Each piece of clothing on top of one another becomes more and more layers in your box, but your vacuum-sealed bag can smash them into one simple layer.

They won’t even wrinkle when put in a vacuum-sealed bag while packing normally will more likely cause them to become wrinkled. Instead of lugging heavy clothing boxes into the truck and out of the truck, get them into vacuum-sealed bags in just a few boxes.

Food

You may have never heard of vacuum-sealing food, but this can be one of the handiest places to use these bags. It will help keep your perishable foods lasting longer when you vacuum seal. It’s a great way to protect your food during the move, avoid food going bad, keep the food fresh, and ensure the food will last longer.

 By BBCLCD (Own work) [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC BY 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0)], via  Wikimedia Commons

By BBCLCD (Own work) [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC BY 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Perks of vacuum-sealed bags and what items to avoid

In addition, to protect your items and saving space, vacuum-sealed bags are an inexpensive purchase that will keep your stuff organized. It will keep your food fresh, turn bulky items into a smaller, more manageable size, and will save you money when moving due to needing fewer boxes and a smaller truck. You also can stop worrying about things getting into the bag since they are air-tight.

Can I just vacuum-seal everything in my home for the move? Watch out for solid items, like antiques, knick-knacks, and office items, which will not benefit from a vacuum-sealed bag. Only flexible items that can be layered will benefit from this process. They will condense from the removal of the air, which means solid items won’t be able to become any smaller for space saving.

If you’re considering vacuum-seal bags for your upcoming residential move, these will come in so much handy while you’re packing up the bedroom and refrigerator!

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Learn the lingo: Moving terms to know on moving day

When moving day is approaching, you are probably in overdrive preparing yourself and your family for the big day. Part of that preparation should be to get familiar with some of the lingo that might be tossed around during moving day conversation.

You may hear about these things during a pre-move survey, during an estimate, on moving day, or after moving day when it’s time for the final tab. The sooner you get to know these terms, the easier it will be to ask the proper questions and prepare yourself for the move. Take a look at some of the lingo you may not have heard before such as accessorial charges and operating authority.

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Bill of lading

One of the terms you’ll hear mentioned is the bill of lading or contract between you and the moving company. This is the binding contract regarding the transport of your household goods.

Consignor or consignee

If they mention of consignor or consignee, you may immediately think of a co-signer on a loan. "Consignor" is actually a term for the person that at the point where you move originates that is the pick-up point person. The consignee is the one that will receive the goods at destination, which is often times the same person as the consignor.

Accessorial charges

If you hear about charges for accessorials, keep in mind that this is very normal. This is the term for any extra charges due to additional services needed outside of the standard services. This could mean that you were charged extra for the moving company supplying you with moving boxes, extra charge for needing an extra pick-up, or you had a higher than usual inventory of something like books.

These miscellaneous items that aren’t going to happen in the standard move just get charged under accessorial charges to cover the extra time, labor, or supplies provided by the movers.

Claim

You’ve probably had to file a claim with a company in the past. You’ll have the option to file a claim if you discover damage or loss of any goods. Submit claims right away to avoid missing out on reimbursement.

You’ll receive standard coverage for free on your move to cover any damaged goods, at approximately 60 cents per pound, but you can purchase additional coverage if you want to be sure your expensive TV or furniture is covered from significant damage. You’ll also want to ask about transit insurance, the insurance that covers the items during transit, to see what is covered and what you need to acquire.

Reweigh

Your movers will weigh the final product of all of your goods on their truck. They’ll go to a weigh-in station in the area to weigh the truck in order to determine what your final weight was, minus the weight of the actual truck.

Your bill will reflect the weight that was moved by getting the weight at a weigh station. They always take an estimate before the move and then the reweigh indicates the actual final weight which is tweaked on the final bill from the originally estimated weight.

Operating authority

If you hear the term “operation authority,” this refers to the certification that the state of federal government gives to authorize the move between geographical areas. This would be acquired before the bill of lading is signed.

Linehaul charges

Lastly, you might hear line haul charges mentioned on the bill. These refer to the basic charges for a long distance move. They are calculated based on your moving weight and the mileage.

When you hear lingo you don’t recognize during the move, don’t feel alone. These are the terms that are often misunderstood by families, but you can go into your move feeling more prepared by learning them here.

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